Making Jewelry Out of Broken Plates

Making Jewelry Out of Broken Plates
The Recycled China Pendant, made by The Broken Plate Pendant Co. of Baltimore, priced at $40.

Editor’s Note: We’re rolling out 12 Days of Indie Merchant Gifts. Readers can vote for their favorite gifts, starting Dec. 12.

Talk about a niche business. Juliet Ames, an independent merchant in Baltimore, specializes in making custom jewelry from broken sentimental family china. The name of her website says it all:IBreakPlates.com.

We received scores of submissions for our gift guidefrom jewelry makers, but Ames’s recycled china pendant stood out to us because it’s truly one-of-a-kind — not to mention quite pretty. And the sentimental inspiration behind her business appealed to our softer side.

“Most mothers, grandmothers and friends show love by preparing a great meal,” she wrote. “When a plate breaks, people save the shards to hold on to what or who the plate represents. I have had the honor of working with broken wedding plates, plates salvaged from hurricane Katrina and plates that survived fires, just to name a few.”

Ames’s jewelry isn’t cheap — this pendant sells for $40 — but one can argue that some things are priceless.

One Response to “Making Jewelry Out of Broken Plates”

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